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VPG - Gabriel Bouchard

The Monster.ca event was a great success. The Employer Branding Powerpoint by Gabriel Bouchard is available below for downloading at the bottom of this page. Over 80 HR professionals attended this unique event to listen to the founder of Monster Canada. We also received great press and her is what the Kitchener Record had to say:

Tried and true recruitment methods out of date
February 29, 2008


ROSE SIMONE
RECORD STAFF

Recruiting talent is about to become a lot tougher, so companies that want the best people should learn to market themselves to those people, the founder of online job site Monster Canada said yesterday.

"Companies that don't do this will lose the war for talent," Gabriel Bouchard, former general manager of Monster Canada, said during a conference at the Waterloo Inn.

Bouchard, who has left Monster Canada and is now in the midst of starting a new company, was speaking to human resource professionals at the conference sponsored by Value Profit Group, which provides workshops, leadership training and other services.

Bouchard said employers are facing a growing "labour crunch" when it comes to filling skilled jobs.

Despite the fact that there are more people than ever before who are available in the workforce, the demand for workers is rising even faster because of economic growth, he said.

On top of that, the huge population of baby boomers is heading into retirement, he said.

"Access to human capital is becoming a strategic issue in North America," Bouchard said.

But many employers still take the same passive, old-school approach to the recruitment process, he said.

When they have a job, they simply post it on an online job board or company website, and hope the best talent will come to them.

Back in the 1960s, that worked, "but those days are gone," he said.

"It is a totally new market now where the challenge is to try to seduce individuals who have the right skill sets."

Organizations therefore need to become much more conscious of the image and brand they are projecting to potential job candidates, he said.

They need figure out how to connect with the best people and court them long before those people start to actively look for new jobs, Bouchard added.

An often-heard complaint of employers is that posting a job on the Internet will tend to produce a large number of resumes, but those resumes are not coming from people who have the skills they want.

But Bouchard said more than 70 per cent of people who are looking at those job ads on the Internet fall into the category of being "poised candidates."

That means they are already employed and may be thinking about finding new work, but don't feel any urgency to send in a resume right away.

Instead, they are just considering their options and doing the research that will set them up for a new job six months or a year down the road.

These are the people that companies and organizations should be marketing themselves to, Bouchard said.

"Those people are going to have a short list of three or four great employers that they want to work with, and those employers will get those resumes," he said.

They will have a job lined up when they leave, and "you won't even know that they were looking," he said.

"If you wait for them to become active candidates, it will be too late."

It is important to connect with those people early, so that when those people do decide to make a career jump, they consider your company, he added.

Also, too many companies don't understand the needs and desires of the people they are trying to attract and how their company could meet those needs, he said.

Bouchard said a company's "brand" for job candidates also has to be a lot more than just a statement on a website or on news releases.

It involves everything, from the way those people are treated by the secretary when they walk in the door, to the feeling they get through the interview process, he said.

"Your brand, as an employer, is the sum of all the experiences that those candidates will go through while interacting with your company," he said.

 

 

 

 

 

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